Online dating business cards

Gershowitz does a lap around the room, her eyes darting to left hands as she scans for single status.She approaches a tall 35-year-old man who is leaning against a wall in classic single hovering fashion, cooly nursing what seems to be a fine whiskey.When a suitor receives the card, the idea is that they’re so filled with curiosity that they enter the code on Cheek’d and are taken to your profile page. See, Cheek’d wants to take out the online part of online dating.It forces real-life interaction, even if that interaction seems a bit awkward to me.Matchmaking may seem like an odd profession for a millennial, but Three Day Rule has six locations and 19 matchmakers like Gershowitz.At a time when it has never been easier to meet significant others (or insignificant others) through an app or website, the company is raising money for plans to open 40 offices that offer old-fashioned matchmaking services.“There’s a hot guy at the end of the bar, and you may not know he’s there,” she continued. is 30 feet from you.” The app also keeps a list of every potential match you pass during the day.Maybe you’ll discover there’s a cute guy with whom you’ve ridden the subway a bunch of times on the way into work, but who you’ve never noticed was there.

Why would I hand someone a card that says “hi,” (yes there are cards that simply say “hi”) instead of just saying hi myself? But they threw out some instances where I could possibly, maybe, potentially see the idea materialize into something helpful.The last time we talked to Lori Cheek, she and her dating app—then called Cheek’d—had just been coldly rejected on national television by Kevin O’Leary, Mark Cuban, Barbara Corcoran, Robert Herjavec and Lori Greiner.Now, almost a full year since her admittedly cringeworthy , in reference to the Sharks, “and I did the exact opposite.” Okay—the words “die in a hole” didn’t exactly escape any of the Sharks’ lips, but there’s no denying they had issues with Ms. The way it worked, users could pass flirty ice-breaker cards to cute strangers they spotted in the real world; then, those strangers could log onto Cheek’d and discover the dating profile of the person who’d just handed them a card.One literally backs into a painting as he starts a conversation with a pretty brunette. Gershowitz, unfazed, flashes a lipstick-lined bright smile and holds out a business card.Erika Gershowitz, a peppy 25-year-old with long brown hair that hangs over one shoulder, is doing the same thing as everyone else—scoping the crowd for attractive singles—but she’s doing it a bit more overtly.“I have the weirdest question,” she says as she taps the hand of a young Indian woman wearing a black leather moto jacket. “I’m a matchmaker.”It’s a spiel she’s given innumerable times since she started her job with a company called Three Day Rule in May of last year.Here’s how it works: you go over to the Cheek’d website, at which point you take a couple minutes to fill out a profile.

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